File maker download

August 25, 2021 / Rating: 4.8 / Views: 699

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How to unlock android phone to download photos

At one time, transferring photos between a PC and a mobile device could be a real pain. That’s no longer the case, as PCs and Android devices now have built-in tools to help make transferring photos between the two even easier than ever. In this guide, we divide the transfer methods between the three major operating systems: If you want to download photos from your Android device, this is the way to go. Plus, you have the added benefits of texting, making calls, and receiving Android-related notifications on your Windows 10 PC. Step 1: Download and install Microsoft’s Your Phone Companion app from Google Play on your Android device. If you’re already signed in via another Microsoft app, tap the blue to finish the setup process. Step 11: On the Windows 10 PC, allow the Your Phone app to pin itself to the taskbar. This is optional but makes accessing the app more convenient versus scrolling down the Start Menu to find the app. Make sure you have the right USB cable to connect your phone to your PC. Step 4: The phone should now appear in File Explorer as a USB drive. Most modern phones require a USB-C cable, though double-check what connection your laptop or desktop has too, to make sure it can connect on the other end. Move photos between the phone and PC like you would any USB flash drive. Step 5: Eject the phone when done and unplug it from the PC. Be sure both devices have Bluetooth enabled before moving forward. Your default go-to cloud service should be One Drive. Just install the Microsoft One Drive app on your Android device and have it automatically upload your photos to Microsoft’s cloud. If you’re not using the Camera Roll option, a good rule of thumb is to create an folder on One Drive, so you know where to manually send and retrieve photos, especially screenshots. Make sure all photos are synced to your Windows 10 PC so you’re swapping photos via File Explorer versus using a browser. Photos uploaded from Android should now be accessible. Step 7: In the One Drive app for Android, you can access the same folder and download photos uploaded from your PC. If you don’t want to use One Drive, alternatives include Dropbox and Google Drive. Step 6: The phone should now appear in Android File Transfer on Mac. Drag photos between Finder and Android File Transfer. Step 7: Eject the phone when done and unplug it from the Mac. Unfortunately, you can’t use i Cloud to push files between an Android device and a Mac. Be sure both devices have Bluetooth enabled before moving forward. In this case, you’ll need Microsoft One Drive (which is ideal if you also use a Windows 10 PC), Dropbox, or Google Drive. Of the three, you’d expect a Chromebook to feel more “native” when transferring photos between it and an Android device. But given the web-centric roots of Chrome OS, you have an easier time swapping photos on a Windows 10 PC. Use it to drag photos back and forth between the devices. Nearby Share shows promise, but it’s still under development. Step 5: Disconnect the Android phone when you’re done. As previously stated, Google is currently working on a new feature that both replaces Android Beam, which relied on NFC, and mimics Apple’s Air Drop. Called Nearby Share, it establishes a wireless connection between two Android devices, or between an Android device and a Chromebook for transferring files without a physical connection. It’s now somewhat available in the Chrome OS 87 Stable channel, but you need to enable a few flags first. This should be your first go-to cloud-based app to move photos between a Chromebook and an Android device. You can find this app already installed on the Launcher. However, it works best if Google Photos is the default photos app on Android. Step 1: With the Photos app open on a Chromebook, click to open the button to finish. Google Drive should be your go-to cloud service for Chrome OS devices. It’s built into the Files app and listed on the menu to the left. In turn, use Google’s Files app on your Android device to easily move all files between it and a Chromebook, not just photos. If you’re not fond of Google Drive, you can use Dropbox or Microsoft One Drive to transfer files using a browser or the Android app. With the right adapter, you can connect a USB drive to your Android phone to move photos to and from the device. However, the phone needs to support USB On-The-Go, which is a protocol for enabling data transfers through the phone’s USB-based charging port. This protocol supports file transfers, external peripherals, and so on. On older Android phones, you’ll need a Micro-USB to USB-A adapter, as USB drives typically ship with USB-A connectors. Meanwhile, if you’re using an external hard drive or SSD, you can get away with purchasing a new cable with the connectors you need — if a compatible cable didn’t ship with the drive. Unlike i Phones, Android smartphones support Micro SD cards to expand their storage capacity. They usually require you to open the tray using the supplied key or something similar (a push pin works) to remove it from the phone. You would then need an adapter to read this minuscule card on a PC with an SD card slot, or a USB adapter with an included Micro SD card slot. Of all the available options, this method is not ideal but doable. Just remember to save all photos to this card before removing it from the phone. If you just want to swap one of two photos, emailing them may be the quickest solution no matter the target PC. This way, you don’t need to set up apps and/or synchronize cloud storage folders. At one time, transferring photos between a PC and a mobile device could be a real pain. That’s no longer the case, as PCs and Android devices now have built-in tools to help make transferring photos between the two even easier than ever. In this guide, we divide the transfer methods between the three major operating systems: If you want to download photos from your Android device, this is the way to go. Plus, you have the added benefits of texting, making calls, and receiving Android-related notifications on your Windows 10 PC. Step 1: Download and install Microsoft’s Your Phone Companion app from Google Play on your Android device. If you’re already signed in via another Microsoft app, tap the blue to finish the setup process. Step 11: On the Windows 10 PC, allow the Your Phone app to pin itself to the taskbar. This is optional but makes accessing the app more convenient versus scrolling down the Start Menu to find the app. Make sure you have the right USB cable to connect your phone to your PC. Step 4: The phone should now appear in File Explorer as a USB drive. Most modern phones require a USB-C cable, though double-check what connection your laptop or desktop has too, to make sure it can connect on the other end. Move photos between the phone and PC like you would any USB flash drive. Step 5: Eject the phone when done and unplug it from the PC. Be sure both devices have Bluetooth enabled before moving forward. Your default go-to cloud service should be One Drive. Just install the Microsoft One Drive app on your Android device and have it automatically upload your photos to Microsoft’s cloud. If you’re not using the Camera Roll option, a good rule of thumb is to create an folder on One Drive, so you know where to manually send and retrieve photos, especially screenshots. Make sure all photos are synced to your Windows 10 PC so you’re swapping photos via File Explorer versus using a browser. Photos uploaded from Android should now be accessible. Step 7: In the One Drive app for Android, you can access the same folder and download photos uploaded from your PC. If you don’t want to use One Drive, alternatives include Dropbox and Google Drive. Step 6: The phone should now appear in Android File Transfer on Mac. Drag photos between Finder and Android File Transfer. Step 7: Eject the phone when done and unplug it from the Mac. Unfortunately, you can’t use i Cloud to push files between an Android device and a Mac. Be sure both devices have Bluetooth enabled before moving forward. In this case, you’ll need Microsoft One Drive (which is ideal if you also use a Windows 10 PC), Dropbox, or Google Drive. Of the three, you’d expect a Chromebook to feel more “native” when transferring photos between it and an Android device. But given the web-centric roots of Chrome OS, you have an easier time swapping photos on a Windows 10 PC. Use it to drag photos back and forth between the devices. Nearby Share shows promise, but it’s still under development. Step 5: Disconnect the Android phone when you’re done. As previously stated, Google is currently working on a new feature that both replaces Android Beam, which relied on NFC, and mimics Apple’s Air Drop. Called Nearby Share, it establishes a wireless connection between two Android devices, or between an Android device and a Chromebook for transferring files without a physical connection. It’s now somewhat available in the Chrome OS 87 Stable channel, but you need to enable a few flags first. This should be your first go-to cloud-based app to move photos between a Chromebook and an Android device. You can find this app already installed on the Launcher. However, it works best if Google Photos is the default photos app on Android. Step 1: With the Photos app open on a Chromebook, click to open the button to finish. Google Drive should be your go-to cloud service for Chrome OS devices. It’s built into the Files app and listed on the menu to the left. In turn, use Google’s Files app on your Android device to easily move all files between it and a Chromebook, not just photos. If you’re not fond of Google Drive, you can use Dropbox or Microsoft One Drive to transfer files using a browser or the Android app. With the right adapter, you can connect a USB drive to your Android phone to move photos to and from the device. However, the phone needs to support USB On-The-Go, which is a protocol for enabling data transfers through the phone’s USB-based charging port. This protocol supports file transfers, external peripherals, and so on. On older Android phones, you’ll need a Micro-USB to USB-A adapter, as USB drives typically ship with USB-A connectors. Meanwhile, if you’re using an external hard drive or SSD, you can get away with purchasing a new cable with the connectors you need — if a compatible cable didn’t ship with the drive. Unlike i Phones, Android smartphones support Micro SD cards to expand their storage capacity. They usually require you to open the tray using the supplied key or something similar (a push pin works) to remove it from the phone. You would then need an adapter to read this minuscule card on a PC with an SD card slot, or a USB adapter with an included Micro SD card slot. Of all the available options, this method is not ideal but doable. Just remember to save all photos to this card before removing it from the phone. If you just want to swap one of two photos, emailing them may be the quickest solution no matter the target PC. This way, you don’t need to set up apps and/or synchronize cloud storage folders.

date: 25-Aug-2021 22:02next


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